Product Photography: Vegan Snacks with The Cracker Shack

Product Photography: Vegan Snacks with The Cracker Shack

Product photography is another part of food photography that no one tells you about. You spend hours mastering styled food photography and forget that sometimes it’s not about the food but what you used to make it.

If you go through the millions of product photography pictures on the internet you will realise that this facet of food photography has many different styles that all depend upon what your client wants. The first step to creating good product photography is figuring out what your client wants. Its all well and good to have your own ideas but without a clear image of what the client wants you to produce then all you’ll be doing is wasting each other’s time.

Figuring out what your client wants involves a lot of back and forth that may seem unnecessary but will help you both understand what the final product will be. Usually, when a client reaches out they will have a vague idea of what they want. If this is the case then it is always best to ask if they have any images that you can use as a reference. From there you can figure out your own way to recreate the image according to the client’s needs. Other times if you’re lucky, the client already has a set of sample images that you can use. The worst-case scenario is where you have to build the image yourself from scratch. There is no need to panic though. If this happens then you simply need to guide the client by sending them either your own images that you have shot before or similar images sourced from the internet to give them a clearer image of what you intend to shoot. You just need to make sure that when you send these images (in the form of a mood board or styling guideline) you need to mention that they are for reference only so that you don’t end up plagiarizing somebody else’s work (or style) all for the sake of pleasing your client.

Here are some other tips as well:

  • Make sure the products your shooting have been sent to you in perfect condition. The last thing you want is to struggle shooting wrinkled packets that can’t be fixed in post.
  • Minimise reflection on the packages by diffusing your light. This is especially important if you’re using natural light like I do.

Now that you’ve got all that sorted, you can shoot! For this shoot, I had sample images from the client and used simple backgrounds to highlight each packet.

Photo by 5 Foot 2 Snaps
Photo by 5 Foot 2 Snaps
Photo by 5 Foot 2 Snaps
Photo by 5 Foot 2 Snaps
Photo by 5 Foot 2 Snaps
Photo by 5 Foot 2 Snaps

I shot these images using my Nikon D5600 and my nifty 50mm lens. In hindsight I see that I should have used an aperture of around f/9-11 however I shot these at f/5.6 with a shutter speed of 1/200 and ISO 100.